Lithuanian Language Classes

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Learn to Speak Lithuanian

Lithuanian Alphabet

Photo by: Szczecinolog
of Wikimedia Commons

Each year, various language clubs gather in Philadelphia and its suburbs for 10-week courses in Lithuanian language studies. Our classes are small, so students enjoy active participation and individualized teacher instruction.

Our students are an eclectic mix including men and women from business and industry, stay at home moms, high school students, and retirees. Everyone is welcome to enroll since classes range from beginner to novice levels and include conversational and written language studies. Coursework includes culture, music, games, the Lithuanian alphabet, pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary, and conversation.

For details regarding enrollment in future Lithuanian language classes in Philadelphia, please contact Janė Cox. We recognize that our students have varied obligations and try to accommodate them with flexible class scheduling. The cost is $120 for a 10-week course and the duration of each class is approximately two hours.

If you are searching for children’s Lithuanian language classes, contact the Vincas Kreve Lithuanian Sunday School at St. Andrew Church on 19th and Wallace Streets in Philadelphia. Children’s classes commence each year in September.

Do you have a quick question about the Lithuanian language or need help with a translation? Ask your question below (by commenting in the “leave a reply” section) and one of our teachers or students will try to help you.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Let’s get started!

  • Hi…labas
  • Goodbye…sudiev
  • See you later…iki pasimatymo
  • Please…prašau
  • Thank you…ačiū
  • How are you…kaip jums sekasi
  • Good morning…labas rytas
  • Good evening…labas vakaras
  • Good night…labanaktis
  • Have a nice day…geros dienos
  • To your health…į sveikatą
  • Lithuania…Lietuva
  • Lithuanian…Lietuviškai

Have A Lithuanian Translation Question? Ask One Of Our Teachers Here!

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13 comments
lithuanianmha
lithuanianmha moderator

Hello Kathy.

Thank you for contacting us.  What treasures you have in those letters!  The possibilities are so exciting!  I'll forward your message to our Board and a few others in our community to see if anyone can help you.  Good luck and thank you for visiting lithuanianmha.org!

15588
15588

I am working on my family's history. My maternal grandparents came from Lithuania. My grandmother kept a handful of letters that date back to the 20's and 30's that may give me information on my family. The problem-she's no longer alive and I can't read them. What would it cost to have someone read a letter and provide a translated summary?

Kathy





PJDavis
PJDavis

Hi, both my grandparents came to U.S.A. from Vilnius, Lithuania in early 1900's.  My Grandma would say (my way to pronounce)"Wy yea Popeeka wy yea".  Do you have any idea of what it could be? How she said it depended on if she was happy or upset with me. I would appreciate your help very much.  thank you P.J.

lithuanianmha
lithuanianmha moderator

Labas, Salley.  Yes, the "s" is pronounced.  The ending has a shorter sound -- more like the ending of the city, Caracas (Venezuela) than it does the ending of the fish, bass. The first syllable, rhymes with "job."  Hope this helps!

salley
salley

is the "S" pronounced in Lithuanian.  i.e. labas ? la-baa  or la-bass?

Denise Anastasi Santora
Denise Anastasi Santora

Please let me know if there are any Lithuanian Language classes available near the South Jersey area. Thank You

Christiana
Christiana

Helen, we appreciate hearing from you and are excited about your passion for your Lithuanian heritage! Thank you for your kind words on our music page, too. If you live within the Philadelphia region, please consider attending our monthly Amber Roots heritage club meetings. These meetings are free and usually include a Lithuanian language lesson. If you aren't within driving distance of Philadelphia, you may find livemocha.com helpful. They offer some complimentary language courses and have a vibrant Lithuanian community following. We hope to meet you at one of our upcoming events! Thank you for contacting us.

Helen Kruse
Helen Kruse

I want to learn Lithuanian so much. When I was 6 my Pop,(Grandfather) passed and 12 when an Aunt who came from Lithuania passed,and maybe 5 when she had to move from Pennsylvania to Seattle. So,what I had begun to learn was lost because I had no one to speak it with. Maybe someone wants to learn English. I can teach them English, they can teach me Lithuanian. Does anyone know how or where I start looking? Thanks~

Kestutis Lukas
Kestutis Lukas

I remember hearing "linksmo gimtadienio tau" as I was growing up. Happy birthday to you, literally. But, there are always family variations of that.

Jane Cox
Jane Cox

Ilgiausiu metu, which is also the Lithuanian happy birthday song, means longest years. You can also change the first word from Ilgiausiu (Longest) to Laimingu (happy/ fortunate), sveikatos (healthy), vaisingu (fertile :)) and dziaugsmingu (joyful). There are many more options of course using different adjectives. The complete form of su gimtadieniu is Sveikinu su gimtadieniu or literally, I greet you with your birthday!

Christiana
Christiana

Besides "Su Gimtadieniu," what are a few ways to wish someone a happy birthday in Lithuanian? On facebook, I see lots of variations of this greeting, but don't know the exact difference/meaning of them. Could you elaborate?

15588
15588

@lithuanianmha Thank you! I'm excited to learn what these letters will reveal after all these years.

Jane Cox
Jane Cox

@PJDavis  Labas, P.J. Sorry it took so long to get back to you. My name is Janė and I teach the Lithuanian classes connected to the Music Hall. This doesn't sound like Lithuanian to me (though maybe I'm not saying it right). I wonder if it is Polish or Russian or another language in the region? Do you know if Lithuanian was their language? Before WWII, a high percentage of people who lived in Vilnius were Polish and Jewish, with some Russians and others as well. Even ethnic Lithuanians, especially in Vilnius, had adopted Polish as their language at the time. It's also possible that she spoke Lithuanian, but used expressions in other languages also. Such was the case with my Lithuanian-speaking grandmother, who used expressions and terms she picked up from Poles, Ukrainians, Jews and others in her neighborhood - we are still trying to figure out what some expressions she used mean and what languages they were in ! Please let us know what you find out - it's so interesting to figure out these language mysteries from our immigrant ancestors.

Sekmės (Good luck)